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Stream Classes in Java | Byte Stream Classes

I recently have had a lot of interest in stream processing and how to stream data in a java application. So here is my attempt at providing a basic understanding of the process.

Stream Classes in Java | Byte Stream Classes In the article, you will learn about the streams in Java. Streams are a fundamental data abstraction in programming languages such as Java. Java is a class-based object-oriented programming language that runs on top of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), which is an implementation of the Java bytecode specification. The streams in Java are the easiest way to implement a sequence of data that can be read, processed, and written.

Streaming is something that has been around for a while, but it has not gained much popularity. When I was first introduced to the concept I was a bit skeptical. After researching it, my mind was blown.

You can use a stream for many different scenarios, but the main reason I chose to use them is that their are very easy to implement. Included in this blog post is a tutorial on how to create a (simple) stream class.

Threads in Java are an ordered sequence of data. Java performs input and output operations in the form of threads. It uses the concept of threads to make I/O operations fast. For example, when we read a sequence of bytes from a binary file, we are actually reading the input stream. Similarly, when we write a string of bytes to a binary file, we write to the output stream.

Byte flow and sign flow

Modern versions of the Java platform define two types of input/output streams:

  • Byte current
  • Character Current

Byte flow

Byte streams in Java are intended to provide a convenient way to handle the input and output of bytes (i.e., 8-bit data units). They are used to read or write binary I/O data. They are particularly used for working with binary files such as executables, image files and files in low-level formats such as .zip, .class, .obj and .exe. Binary files are files that are read by a machine. For example, a Java class file has. B. the .class extension and cannot be read by a human.

It can be processed by low-level tools such as the JVM (java.exe executable on Windows) and the Java disassembler (javap.exe executable on Windows). Another concrete example is saving a photo as a .bmp or .jpeg file. These files are obviously not readable by humans. They can only be changed using photo editing or image processing software. The byte streams used for reading are called input streams and those used for writing are called output streams. In Java, they are represented by the abstract classes InputStream and OutputStream.

Characteristic flow

Character streams in Java are designed to handle character input and output. They use 16-bit Unicode characters. Character streams are more efficient than byte streams. They are mainly used for reading or writing to character or text input and output devices, such as text files, text documents, XML and HTML files.

Text files are human readable files. For example, a .txt file that contains human-readable text. This file is created with a text editor such as . B. Notepad created under Windows. The character streams used for reading are called readers and those used for writing are called writers. In Java, they are represented by the abstract classes Reader and Writer.

Streaming classes in Java

All threads in Java are represented by classes in the java.io package. This package contains many thread classes that can handle all types of data. These feed classes can be divided into two main groups, depending on the type of date. These include:

  • Byte stream classes (support byte-based I/O processing)
  • Character flow classes (support for controlling character input/output operations)

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Let’s analyze the byte and character classes in turn.

Byte stream classes in Java

In Java, there are two types of byte stream classes. They are as follows:

  • InputStream classes
  • OutputStream classes

A hierarchical diagram of the byte flow classifications is shown in the figure above.

InputStream classes in Java

The class InputStream is an abstract class. This is the main class for reading binary I/O data. It is a superclass of all classes representing the bytest input stream. Since the class InputStream is an abstract class, we cannot create an object of this class. We need to use subclasses of this class to create the object. Multiple subclasses of a Java InputStream class can be used to perform multiple input functions. They are listed with a short description in the following table:

InputStream subclass Description
Buffered input current It adds buffer functions to the input current. Simply put, it buffers the input current.
ByteArrayInputStream An input stream that reads data from an array of bytes.
DataInputStream It reads the bytes of the input stream and converts them into corresponding primitive or string values.
FileInputStream This input stream reads the bytes of the file.
FilterInputStream It filters the bytes out of the input stream.
ObjectInputStream Input flow for objects
PipedInputStream It creates a communication channel through which data can be received.
PushbackInputStream This is a subclass of FilterInputStream that adds push functionality to the input stream.
SequenceInputStream It is used to read the input streams sequentially one after the other.

InputStream methods in Java

Java’s abstract InputStream class defines several methods for performing input functions, such as. B. read bytes, close streams, mark positions in streams, etc. All of these methods are available in the java.io.InputStream package.

The InputStream methods are the following: 1. int Read() : The read() method reads another byte of data from the input stream. Returns the byte read as an int value between 0 and 255. If there are no bytes because the end of the stream has been reached, the value -1 is returned. If this method encounters an I/O error, it throws an IOException.

The read() method returns int -1 instead of byte, because this indicates the end of the stream. 2. int read(byte[ ] b) : This method reads the number of bytes of the input stream and stores them in a byte array b. Returns the total number of bytes read as an integer. When the end of the flow is reached, -1 is returned. 3. int read(byte[ ] b, int n, int m) : It reads up to m bytes of data from the input stream, starting with the nth byte, into array b.

Returns the total number of bytes read as an integer. Returns -1 at the end of the stream because there is no more data. 4. int available() : The method available gives an estimate of the number of bytes that can be read (or skipped) from the input stream. 5. void close() : The close() method closes the input stream and releases all associated system resources. 6. long skip(long n) : This method skips n bytes of data from the specified input stream. It gives the actual number of missing bytes. 7. void reset() : The reset() method is used to return to the beginning of the thread. 8. boolean markSupported() : This method verifies that the specified input stream supports the mark and reset methods. Returns true if the input stream supports the Mark and Reset methods.

OutputStream classes in Java

The class OutputStream is an abstract class. This is the main class for writing binary data. This is a superclass for all classes that represent the output of the byte stream. Indeed, OutputStream, like InputStream, is an abstract class, so we cannot create its object.

The classification hierarchy of the OutputStream class is shown in the diagram above. Several subclasses of the OutputStream class in Java can be used to perform several output functions. They are listed with a short description in the following table:

subclass OutputStream Description
Buffered output current It adds buffer functions to the output current. Simply put, it buffers the output current.
ByteArrayOutputStream An output stream that writes data to an array of bytes.
DataOutputStream It converts the primitive or string values to bytes and outputs the bytes to the stream.
FileOutputStream It writes a stream of bytes to a file.
FilterOutputStream It filters the bytes out of the output stream.
ObjectOutputStream Output flow for objects
PipedOutputStream It creates a communication channel through which data can be transferred.

OutputStream methods in Java

The OutputStream class defines the following methods in the java.io.OutputStream package that perform output tasks such as writing bytes, closing threads, and flushing threads.

OutputStream’s methods are listed below with a brief description: 1. void write(int b) : The write() method writes the specified byte to the output stream. It takes an int value as input parameter. An IOException is thrown when an IO error has occurred (for example, the output stream is closed). void write(byte[ ] b) : This method writes all bytes specified in array b to the output stream. 3. void write(byte[ ] b, int n, int m) : It writes m bytes of array b, starting with the nth byte, to the output stream. 4. void close() : It closes the output stream and releases all system resources associated with that stream. 5. void flush() : It clears the output stream and forces the writing of all buffered output bytes.

We hope that this tutorial has covered almost all important points and related topics about thread classes in Java. I hope you understood the main points of byte thread classes in Java. In the next lesson, we will look at character flow classes in Java. Thanks for reading!!!Imagine you have a data stream that contains data of various types. You may want to read the data from this stream into multiple Java classes so that each class can process the data it needs to do its job. Or you may want to parse the stream to extract the data you want to store to a database..

Read more about byte stream in java ppt and let us know what you think.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are the stream classes in Java?

There are a number of good articles online about the stream classes in Java.

Here are just a few: Stream classes in Java – Java 8 – Oracle Java Blog Stream classes in Java – Java 8 – JavaWorld Stream classes in Java – Java 8 – Absolute Java Stream classes in Java – Java 8 – JavaWorld A day with the Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld Blog The Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld Blog Streams in Java 8: Initial Thoughts – JavaWorld Blog Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld Blog Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld Blog Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld Blog Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld Blog Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld Blog Streams in Java 8 – JavaWorld In the Java programming language, a stream is a collection of a data, where data is of two types: Positve or Negative Integers.

What is byte stream class in Java?

A stream is an object that can generate a sequence of bytes without wasting the memory, so in Java you can embed a stream in a class and use it in a program. The stream class in Java is a very powerful stream that can be used to perform many tasks like reading a stream of bytes, reading a file line by line, and parsing a file.

A byte stream is a sequence of bytes. It can either be a single byte, or it can be a sequence of bytes that contains a single byte. You can think of a byte stream as being a sequence of bytes that are encapsulated in a class. This class is responsible for making it easy to read and write. The class is also responsible for holding the position of each byte.

How are the stream classes classified?

Java’s Stream API is a collection of classes that are part of the Java standard library and enable programmers to write data processing applications in a more concise, expressive and portable way. There are two basic kinds of stream classes in Java: those that produce data as they flow through an application and those that read data from a stream and provide a means to process it. A “Stream” class is a type of Java object which is used to manipulate data passed to it from the outside world.

A stream is a sequence of objects. The stream is created for each new input sequence to be processed. An example is a file that is being read from disk. Additional features can be introduced to the stream to make it more effective. Streams are usually created by a stream class, which defines how to create the stream, how to process the input sequence, and how to get the output sequence.






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